I statements for kids

I Statements for Kids: What They Are and How to Use Them

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An I statement is a powerful communication tool that can help you process and communicate your emotions. I statements for kids can be especially helpful, as they can provide a way for children to understand and express their feelings in a healthy way. I statements don’t change the way your child feels, but they can help them communicate those feelings in the best way possible.

I statements for kids

What are I statements?

I statements are sentences that begin with the word “I.” They are a way to express how you feel without attacking or judging someone else.

I statements can help children identify and understand their emotions, as well as communicate them in a healthy way. I statements are an effective communication tool because they pull blame off from the other person and focus on how you feel.

For example: I feel _____ when you _____.

When children use I statements, they are more likely to be heard and understood by others.

How can kids use I statements?

I statements can be used in a variety of situations, such as when your child is feeling angry, sad, or frustrated.

For example, if your child is feeling angry, they might say,

“I feel angry when you take my toy without asking.”

If your child is feeling sad, they might say,

“I feel sad because I didn’t get to play with my friends today.”

And if your child is feeling frustrated, they might say,

“I feel frustrated because I can’t figure out how to do this puzzle.”

I-statements vs you-statements

You-statements are sentences that begin with the word “you.” They tend to be accusatory and can make the other person feel defensive. For example:

“You always leave your toys out.”

“You never listen to me.”

In contrast, I statements are not accusatory and focus on how you feel. For example:

“I feel _____ when you _____.”

How I statements can change the way your kids talk

I statements can help your child to express their emotions in a healthy way. They can also help your child to understand and empathize with others.

If your child says “I feel angry when you take my toy without asking,” they are more likely to be heard and understood by the other person. This can lead to a more productive conversation where both parties can share their feelings and find a resolution.

How can I statements help your kids cope with emotions?

I statements can help children to understand and cope with their emotions. They can also provide a way for children to communicate their feelings.

Practical tips for using I statements with kids

Here are some ways that you can help your child use I statements:

  • Encourage your child to use I statements when they are feeling strong emotions.
  • Listen to your child when they use I statements and validate their feelings.
  • Help your child to identify the different emotions that they are feeling.
  • Teach your child how to use I statements in a variety of different situations.
  • Practice using I statements with your child in a safe and supportive environment.

The parts of an I statement

An I statement typically has three parts:

  • The feeling: This is the emotion that your child is feeling.
  • The trigger: This is what caused the feeling.
  • The need: This is what your child needs in order to feel better.
I statements for kids

Need more ideas for teaching your child to deal with strong emotions?

Read: Breathing Exercises for Kids

Helping your kids practice I statements

  • Teach your child how to identify their emotions. This will help them know when to use an I statement.
  • Encourage your child to use I statements when they are feeling strong emotions.
  • Model the use of I statements yourself. When you’re feeling strong emotions, use an I statement to share how you’re feeling with your child.
  • Listen to your child when they use I statements and validate their feelings.
  • Help your child to identify the different emotions that they are feeling.
  • Teach your child how to use I statements in a variety of different situations.
  • Practice using I statements with your child in a safe and supportive environment.

I statements can be a helpful tool for children to understand and cope with their emotions. With practice, children can learn to use I statements in a variety of different situations. By modeling the use of I statements and listening to your child, you can help them to develop this skill.

What do you think about I statements? Do you find them helpful? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

I statements for kids

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